AR/ VR: Mainstream, But for a Small Section?

CIO Review Europe | Monday, March 15, 2021

People may have come across the technologies unknowingly: virtual apparel shopping, apartment tours, tourism, and even high-end industrial solutions like professional flight simulators. The promise of AR and VR systems is limitless, but they are only available to a few groups that can afford them for the time being.

FREMONT, CA:  Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) have been popular for a select few, with applications ranging from entertainment to online commerce and healthcare. However, due to an innovation gap that exacerbates the digital divide, many communities are yet to see these disruptive technologies' full effect. Consider the importance of this technology for industries like education, mines, and tourism, which were effectively shut down by the recent COVID-19 pandemic.

The recent global health crisis has shown how a failure to digitize supply chains across markets has profoundly impacted globalsocioeconomic conditions, highlighting and even exacerbating the digital divide.

AR/VR is Widely Used, But Only in A Limited Part of The Digital World

For the uninitiated, VR and AR may be thought of as digital environments in which a scene is recreated in a digital space, and participants can communicate with it using computer-based objects.When young peopleare asked about VR or AR, they will most likely tell about the new headset on the market for playing video games or engaging with social media.

People may have come across the technologies unknowingly: virtual apparel shopping, apartment tours, tourism, and even high-end industrial solutions like professional flight simulators.The promise of AR and VR systems is limitless, but they are only available to a few groups that can afford them for the time being.

According to a statistic, an estimated 3.7 billion people are now without access to the internet. The majority of the unconnected live in developing nations, where just two out of every ten inhabitants have access to the internet. Because of sluggish speeds and the high cost of smartphones and connectivity, the UN Broadband Commission acknowledges that more than half of those who are considered ‘connected’ do not have access to a complete digital experience. COVID-19 has shown that people must strive harder to improve this image quickly, and mainstreaming technologies such as AR/VR will play a vital role in delivering meaningful communication in this regard.

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